Barley features Print
Barley belongs to the oldest known cereals . It is presumed to have come to European territory from the Near East. Barley has been grown on our territory for a long time which is confirmed by a great number of archeological findings.

The boom in barley growing began in the 16th and 17th centuries thanks to more intensive grain growing which had created conditions for barley processing to malt and consequently even beer-brewing. Favourable development in barley growing has been interrupted during World War I. After the war was over, barley growing has been quickly revived.
For malting purposes we mainly grow spring two-rowed barley, first-rate malting varieties of home production registered in the European Catalogue of varieties and seeds. They are suitable for the production of malt. We use such varieties as Malz, Ebson, Jersey and Prestige.
The grain of malting barley must be a high quality raw material. From the technological point of view, easily germinating varieties of barley that loose the least of nutrients at germinating are considered to be the best varieties. The colour of grain should be light-yellow, yellow or gray-yellow without brown tops and with the least mechanical damage. The grain has fresh aroma, shape is required to be round. The chaff are lightly lined, thin and fine. It is important for the malting process in connection with the ability of grain to absorb water and grow at germination. The size of grain must comply with STN 461100-5/2004 (Slovak Technical Norm). The grain over 2.5 mm x 20 mm sieve proportion standard is 90 %. Important technological indicator is also germinative activity of grain which should be over 98 % and content of total proteins in a dry substance should be within 10,5-11,5 % . Generally speaking bigger grains contain more starch, therefore they have better extractivity. A well-proportioned size of grains is important at steeping (so the grain can absorb water regularly) and subsequent moving of malt on sliding pieces (the grain has the same germinative energy and the same start at germination). Lately, homogenity of varieties is emphasized because of its importance for the production of quantitavely one-variety malt.

Generally speaking, bigger grains contain more starch, therefore they have better extractivity. A well-proportioned size of grains is important at steeping and subsequent moving of malt on sliding pieces.
Lately, homogenity of varieties is emphasized because of its importance for the production of quantitatively one-variety malt.